Covered Bridges of New England

I love New England! One of the many regional attractions are its covered bridges. They scream out NEW ENGLAND!  Every New England state has them. Most go back to the 1900’s and were used daily by the local population. Today, they are still used, and are major attractions to both photographers and artists looking to capture a true piece of New England architecture and landscape.

Tannery Hill Bridge – New Hampshire

Tannery Hill Bridge= Revised-CW-1

White Mountain Nat’l Forest Covered Bridge – New Hampshire

White Mt. Natl Bridge-NH-1

Pemigewasset River Bridge (1886) – New Hampshire

Pemigewasset River Bridge 1186-6432

 

Blair Covered Bridge  (White Mountains) – New HampshireBlair BRidge-6469

 

Middle Bridge – Woodstock Vt.

Woodstock Middle Br_DS0740cw--0740

Martin Bridge – Vermont

Blair BRidgeMarin BRidge-CW Redone CW-1232

Jeffersonville Covered Bridge – Vermont

Jeffersonville Cover Bridge Redone CW-1299

Gorham Bridge – Vermont

Gorham Bridge VT B&W CW-

Cooley Bridge – Vermont

Cooley Bridge-CW Redone-5.jpg

Bridgewater Covered Bridge – Vermont

Bridgewater Vt Covered Bridge - Redonc CW-

Quechee Covered Bridge – VermontQuechee Covered Bridge - CW-

Taftsville Covered Bridge – Vermont

Taftsville overed Bridge- Redone CW-

Lincoln Gap aka Warren Bridge – Vermont

Covered Bridge Rd-Vermont 2015 (1 of 1)

Chamberlin Mill Covered Bridge, Lyndon, Vermont

Chamberlin Bridge - Lyndon, Vt-DSC1061-1061

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

Maine’s Pemaquid Point Lighthouse was commissioned by President John Quincy Adams in 1827 and was built that same year. Construction did not go well due to the use of salt water in the mortar mix. In less than ten years the structure began to fall apart and was replaced by a second Lighthouse in 1835.

The lighthouse was voted by the state’s residents to be featured on the Maine quarter as part of the 50 State Quarters Program issued by the U.S. Mint. The program began in 1999. Maine’s quarter was the 23rd in the series, issued in 2003.

Pemaquid Lighthouse_CW Fixed-0101

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse DSC0099-CW (1 of 1)

Pemaquid Lighthouse_CW Fixed-0089

 

Book Review: States of Mind

statesOkay, I admit I am bias about New England. It’s my favorite part of the country.  There’s a quaint historical feel  to almost everywhere you go. It’s in the architecture, the landscape, the air and the people. Adding to my bias is the fact my wife was born and raised in Marlboro, MA. Over the years, we have travelled to every state that makes up the geographical area known as New England. Some states like Vermont, Massachusetts and Maine are particular favorites, but I have found something fascinating  and stimulating in all of them.  So when I came across Jacqueline T. Lynch’s collection of essays on what it means to be a New Englander I knew I had to read it. Lynch writes in her introduction, “This is not about New England the place as it is about New England the idea…” She focuses on ideas that came out of the nineteen century and moved us into the twentieth century.

We meet many well-known figures like Annie Sullivan, Louisa May Alcott, Lizzie Bordon  and other historical figures. There are also articles about lessor known individuals particularly women who became an important part of the workforce during the Industrial Revolution. We also learn about  historical landmarks such as Norman’s Woe, a small uninhabited island just off shore from Gloucester, MA. The island and its waters are noted for a series of shipwrecks over the years. Maine poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, immortalized it in his poem, The Wreck of  the Hesperus.

Lynch writes passionately about her subjects and New England in general. Her love for New England shines through on every page. Anyone interested in the history of New England and its influence will find these essays an absorbing read.