Visions of the Palouse

The Palouse, about 70 miles south of Spokane, Washington is a majestic region especially during the harvest season. Sometimes called the Tuscany of America, there are patterns, designs and strong lines creating a visual palette of colors. Below are a few of the photos I have processed so far. All are available for purchase by clicking here.

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The Palouse

Group Photo 1Our recent trip to the Palouse in Washington State was a visually exciting and memorable trip. My wife (Dorothy) and I went with a group of six other photographers led by Jennifer King along with her associates Jeff Silkstone and David Culp. The group was a diverse and fascinating bunch of folks ranging in age from the thirties to the eighties. We had an artist, a cardiologist, a former publisher and a nun! My background and Dorothy’s (accounting) is rather dull compared to all that. More importantly, from the review of our photos that were shared on the final day, all were excellent photographers.

It was a trip filled with intense heat (upper 90’s), plenty of driving (800 miles in five days), extremely dusty dirt roads where you sometimes could not see the car in front of you, and only a few hours’ sleep each night. We were not deterred! After getting up at 3 AM, and a quick snack, we left the motel around 4 AM each morning, resulting in some wonderful sunrise photos and great light until we generally took a break around 9AM for breakfast, a nap or other personal stuff before heading out again around 4PM until the sun came down.

We photographed the majestic rolling hills of the Palouse, sometimes called the Tuscany of America, old barns, many that may not make it through another winter, wind turbines, garbanzo bean, wheat and sunflower fields. You will see many of my photos in future posts.

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The most unexpected, illuminating, and even heartwarming part of the trip was an unexpected stop near a wheat field. Just off the road sat an older man, a woman and a young teenage boy. They were sitting nearby a truck and some other equipment drinking beverages to help ward off the heat. For some reason, our lead car with Jennifer pulled off the road nearby. We sat there for a moment or two wondering what was going on. We later found out the farmers were thinking the same thing. Our own personal nun, Sister Rose Marie, walked over to the people and began talking to them. We all soon joined and began a wonderful interaction. First let me say, they were a warm, engagingly friendly and welcoming family. They talked about their harvesting of the wheat, the long hours and dirty work. The woman’s name was Heather Marie, the daughter of the older man who originally owned the farm, now run by his son. As a child Heather Marie worked on the farm. She now lives in Key West, Florida with her husband cinematographer Jaime Reynoso (Bloodline) and has three young boys.  IMG_5171                                                                   Soft White Wheat

Every year Heather Marie brings her boys up to the Washington farm for the harvest season, not only to help out, but to show them her and their granddad’s roots. The work is hard, the days are long, the sun is hot, and the combines kick up dust as they harvest the wheat. As we continued to talk, they invited us to ride up to where they were currently doing the harvest. This even though, it was quitting time for them. We rode up in their trucks and met the rest of the family and a co-worker. They answered all our questions and happily posed for photos. Before leaving Sister Rose Marie gathered the farming family in a circle and said a prayer blessing them.IMG_5182                                                Sister Rose Marie, in the hat, leading a pray

Needless to say, this was not part of Jennifer’s schedule. It was just one of those unplanned happy and memorable accidents.

Now, back home, begins the task of post processing. I will be sharing some photos here and on my photography page on this website, as well as on my Photography website. Hope you will join me.

 

 

Flowers From the Coastal Maine Botanical Garden

The Coastal Maine Botanical Garden in Boothbay Harbor, Maine is a must see stop if you are ever in the area. My wife and I   spent four and a half hours there recently and we saw only the tip of the iceberg. There are multiple gardens, waterfalls, walking trails, sculptures and more. The photographs of the flowers below represent just a small portion of what there is to see.

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Chives

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Peony

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Calla Lily _CW-0235Calla Lily

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Tumbleweed Onion _CW-0288Tumbleweed Onion

Niagara on TCM

marilyn_monroe_niagara_1953_movie_4Marilyn Monroe stars in the 1953 Henry Hathaway directed film Niagara. It will be on TCM Tuesday August 1st at 10 PM Eastern time.

Below is a short excerpt from my ebook, Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Per Second. The book is available from Amazon.

Henry Hathaway’s “Niagara” opens with two great shots of natural beauty, first is the mighty Niagara Falls with millions upon millions of gallons of water falling with God given power. The second shot is our first view of Marilyn Monroe lying naked under a thin sheet in her motel bedroom. Light shines through the sheet giving us a silhouetted shape of her right thigh. In her hand, a cigarette dangles over the side of the bed. The look on her face is one of satisfaction making one wonder what she was doing while her husband, Joseph Cotton, was off admiring the Falls. We quickly come to learn this marriage is in trouble. When she hears her husband’s keys unlock the door, she puts out the cigarettes, rolls over, her back to the door.  – Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Pet Second.

A Slight Case of Donald Westlake

westlake-photo-0-jpgOne of my favorite crime writers is the late Donald E. Westlake. Westlake was awarded the title of Grand Master by The Mystery Writers of America, as well as a three time Edgar winner. He wrote over 100 novels and numerous short stories and screenplays.

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Westlake was a prolific author, best known for two long running series, one featuring the dark anti-hero known only as Parker, written under one of his many pen names, Richard Stark, and the lighter comedic mysteries featuring John Dortmunder. By 1977, both characters had already made their way to the movie screen. In 1967, the first Parker novel, The Hunter, appeared under the title Point Blank (1) with Parker’s name changed, inexplicably, to Walker. The film featured Lee Marvin in the lead role. Five years later John Dortmunder hit the screen with Robert Redford in The Hot Rock.
ENoughBack in 1977, the author published a book called Enough. It consisted of two novellas, the longer of the two was called A Travesty, and the second, shorter story, was Orb. Enough may be one of the toughest of Westlake’s works to find a copy. I was fortunate enough a few years back to discover a copy at a local library. A Travesty is a dark, comic tale involving a sexually insatiable film critic, Corey Thorpe, who during a heated argument with one of his lovers accidentally kills her. Having seen too many movies, instead of calling the police, Thorpe decides to cover up his involvement in the transgression. Unfortunately, Thorpe’s lover was under surveillance by a blackmailing private investigator. Additionally, the investigating police detective takes a liking to our “‘hero,” and admires his amateur detective instincts. He’s also a frustrated screenwriter and would like Corey to take a look at what he wrote. Along the way, Corey is “forced” to commit a couple of more murders. Regrettably, for the film critic, his voracious appetite for sex does him in when he spurns the wrong woman.

a-slight-case-of-murder-150353l-600x0-w-5cb070a8Let’s fast forward more than 30 years to 1999 and the premiere on TNT of a film called A Slight Case of Murder. It’s not to be confused with the 1938 Edward G Robinson film with the same title, but a made for TV film starring William H. Macy, Felicity Huffman, James Cromwell and Adam Atkin. The film is based on A Travesty and adapted for the screen by Macy and director Steven Schachter. The duo faithfully captures the humorous essence of Westlake’s novella. The film critic’s name was changed in the movie from Corey to Terry, but much of the tale stays close to Westlake’s original work. It’s smart with plenty of visual and verbal nods to the noir films it’s sending up including Terry talking at times directly to the camera (in place of a voice over). It’s filled with murders, sleazy characters and plenty of twists wrapped up in a funny script that film lovers, like myself, will especially love.

The performances by the four main actors are all of high quality, though William H. Macy gets a special nod in a role that some may find reminiscent of his Jerry Lundgaard role in Fargo. Also noteworthy is Julia Campbell’s work as Arkin’s amorous wife, whose affair with Macy leads to his downfall.

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I am a big fan of two of the author’s stand-alone books, The Ax and The Hook, both wonderful satires. In The Ax, the main character is Burke Devore, a quiet company man who after twenty-five years of service becomes a victim of corporate downsizing. After two years of unemployment, his life falling apart, Burke comes up with what he considers the ideal solution, eliminate his competition by killing them off.

The Hook is a devious tale about author Bryce Proctor, a mediocre but best-selling author. Then there is author Wayne Prentice, a more accomplished writer than Procter, but his books no longer hit the best sellers list. Bryce has been going through a rough stretch including a divorce which has led to a bad case of writer’s block. To make it worst he has a deadline quickly approaching on his next book. Wayne comes up with a plan that would help them both. He’ll write the book, give it to Bryce to publish under his name, and they split the royalties 50/50. Bryce is all for it except he has one caveat, Wayne needs to kill Bryce’s wife.

Many of Westlake’s books have made it to the screen, unfortunately not always in a good way. The previously mentioned Point Blank, The Hot Rock, and A Slight Case of Murder are on the plus side. However, more often than not, there were mediocre films like Cops and Robbers, The Twin, The Split, The Bank Shot, and the awful and misguided Jimmy the Kid which was turned into a vehicle for Gary Coleman. Interesting enough, a few of Westlake’s books have been made into films by foreign filmmakers including Costa-Gavras whose 2005 film, Le Couperet, is based on The Ax. In 1966, Jean Luc Godard loosely adapted Westlake’s The Juggler (a Parker novel) turning it into Made in the U.S.A. (2) No one connected with the Goddard film, including Goddard, at the time, bothered acquiring the film rights. Westlake eventually sued and won.

As a screenwriter, Westlake was nominated for an Academy Award for his adaptation of hard-boiled author Jim Thompson’s The Grifters (1990). He also wrote the screenplay for the original The Stepfather film which was adapted from a short story he wrote with co-writers, Brian Garfield and Carolyn Lefcourt. For a full list of Westlake’s film credit’s check here.

If you like reading crime fiction and have not read Donald Westlake, get down to your local independent book store or anywhere books are sold and start catching up. If you like hard boiled fiction, the Parker books written under the name of Richard Stark are must reads. On the lighter side are his John Dortmunder books. Dortmunder is a cool, criminal mastermind, brilliant at planning heist. Unfortunately, his luck is not as good as his talent. Inevitably something always goes wrong.

 

Footnotes:

(1) In 1999, Point Blank (The Hunter) was remade as Payback with Mel Gibson in the lead role. Once again Parker’s name was changed again, this time to Porter.

(2) Wikipedia Donald E. Westlake.

On Being Vegetarian

Eat VegMy wife and I became vegetarian close to twenty-five years ago. We were living in Alpharetta, Ga. at the time. We were never big meat eaters, though I loved my hamburgers, and good Italian sausage which at the time, this was in the early 1990’s, was hard to find in Georgia, the Italian sausage not the burgers. Anyway, for dinner we generally ate chicken, turkey cutlets, fish and pasta. One day, my wife, Dorothy made the big announcement, “I’m not cooking meat anymore.”  I not sure what reaction she expected, but I said okay, since the chicken, turkey and fish dishes were becoming less and less anyway. Dorothy gave up meat and fish completely, while I hung on to eating hamburgers, chicken burgers and tuna sandwiches for lunch. It wasn’t long before meat burgers of any sort  were gone, though I clung on to eating fish on and off for a period of time.

vegetarian-graphic1These days, and its been twenty years or so, I don’t eat meat or fish. I’m vegetarian. Dorothy has moved on even further becoming vegan. We do it for two reasons, the cruelty, the utter unnecessary killing of animals, and also for our health. Red meat is a killer. Processed meats are a killer. Even if you eat meat, you should never eat processed meats (bacon, corned beef, ham, hot dogs, beef jerky, salami, sausage, and others.

Before I go any further, I want to say that I am not going to preach or try to convert (maybe a little bit on the latter; I am just telling my story and how easy it is these days to eat vegetarian. You can eat excellent, tasty, and  healthy foods without animals having to die.

When we first became vegetarians, the choices were much more limited. Maybe there was one or two companies that made veggie burgers. Honestly, they were okay, but not great. One early experience we had was with vegetarian meatballs. As I mentioned earlier, we were living in Alpharetta, Ga. at the time and we were eating pasta a few  times a week; primavera and with a red non-meat sauce. I am of Italian decent and grew up with the tradition that when you had pasta with red sauce, there were meatballs. Well, we found a company somewhere, I don’t remember where, that made non-meat meatballs. We mailed away for a box. It turned out to be a powdery mix where you had to add water, and shape the ingredients into little balls and then cook them. They were terrible! Bland is being kind. That was the end of the meatball experiment. At least for a while.

Today there are many, many choices like Gardein, a company that makes a wide variety of frozen vegetarian products including meatless meatballs, turkey and chicken cutlets. Gardein has become our go to product for many items. Dr, Prager’s, Field Roast, Tofurky are a few other good brands. Like with any food, you have shop and find what you like best. Today, all these products and more, are found in just about any local supermarket. You don’t have to mail away for anything.

Tuscan Kale

Portobello Mushroom with Tuscan Kale and Sweet Potato

My wife likes to find vegetarian recipes that are not too hard to prepare, and most importantly are delicious. Her most recent examples included portobello mushrooms, one of which is pictured above.

Many people are under the assumption that if you are vegetarian all you eat is salads and tofu. Most good restaurants can and will cater to a vegetarian lifestyle, there are still a few places that sadly do not, and they help perpetuate the notion that its salad or nothing.

If there are any vegetarians out there reading this, I would like to hear from you. Why did you switch? What favorites do you have?

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

Maine’s Pemaquid Point Lighthouse was commissioned by President John Quincy Adams in 1827 and was built that same year. Construction did not go well due to the use of salt water in the mortar mix. In less than ten years the structure began to fall apart and was replaced by a second Lighthouse in 1835.

The lighthouse was voted by the state’s residents to be featured on the Maine quarter as part of the 50 State Quarters Program issued by the U.S. Mint. The program began in 1999. Maine’s quarter was the 23rd in the series, issued in 2003.

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Humpback Whale Taking the Big Dive

Humpback whales are beautiful, graceful and  majestic mammals ranging 40 to 60 feet in length, weighting as much as 44 tons. We were fortunate to catch a couple of Humpbacks on a recent trip to Boothbay Harbor in Maine.

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The Puffins of Eastern Egg Rock Island

A recent trip to Boothbay Harbor in Maine provided my wife and me with the opportunity for a boat trip to Eastern Egg Rock Island, an Audubon Society run sanctuary for Atlantic Puffins. The day was beautiful, a little cool out in the ocean, but more important was the number of Puffins that made themselves available to us to photograph.  They are uniquely colorful looking creatures, only about ten inches in length.

No one is allowed to land on the island, except for Audubon employees and volunteers, so we had to shoot from the boat. Subsequently, the distance and the rocking of the boat made photographing a bit challenging at times. Still, with a little bit of luck and assistance from the Puffins, we got the shots.

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